nevver:

Swimming lessons, Shawn Heinrichs

(Source: bluespheremedia.com)

Reblogged from nevver

moreanimalia:

aquasplendens:

realitymonster:

hypeangel:

Pew!

wat

I SAW THIS THE OTHER NIGHT ON TV! So the little thing he’s spitting out is a type of plankton that emits a light when it’s threatened by predators. So, the tetra ate it, and it felt threatened, so it emitted this light which the tetra didn’t like (aka didn’t want to be spotted by other predators at night) so it spat it out!

This was on the show Super Senses, which I talked about the other day because it is an excellent nature show!

moreanimalia:

aquasplendens:

realitymonster:

hypeangel:

Pew!

wat

I SAW THIS THE OTHER NIGHT ON TV!
So the little thing he’s spitting out is a type of plankton that emits a light when it’s threatened by predators. So, the tetra ate it, and it felt threatened, so it emitted this light which the tetra didn’t like (aka didn’t want to be spotted by other predators at night) so it spat it out!

This was on the show Super Senses, which I talked about the other day because it is an excellent nature show!

(Source: highkeygay)

Reblogged from highkeygay

finsterface:

If they don’t get your 30 Rock references, that’s a dealbreaker, ladies!

Reblogged from finsterface

popsealife:

3D Camo

Those things growing out of this giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) are its skin papillae. It can extend and retract its papillae at will, helping it alter its texture to better blend in with its surroundings.

Both papillae expression and color change are controlled by visual, not tactile, cues. This means that these guys don’t need to actually touch anything to decide on their camouflage strategy.

Just by looking, they are clever enough to decide what sort of color, pattern, and texture is needed to virtually disappear. 

video source: Roger Hanlon on Youtube

reference: Allen et al. 2009.

                 Hanlon. 2007.

Reblogged from popsealife

stunningpicture:

Imagine if megalodon sharks were around today

stunningpicture:

Imagine if megalodon sharks were around today

Reblogged from stunningpicture

astrodidact:

When lizards are caught by predators, they can drop their tails to escape and then grow the appendage back. Scientists have studied this regeneration process for decades, in the hopes of understanding how to regenerate human tissues, such as damaged spinal chords and even lost limbs.
Now a team of scientists from Arizona State University in the US has performed the first analysis of all RNA molecules, which translate genes into proteins, during the tail regeneration of a green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis), and worked out the genetic “recipe” that controls the regrowth process. Their results have been published in PLOS ONE.
http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20142308-26062.html

astrodidact:

When lizards are caught by predators, they can drop their tails to escape and then grow the appendage back. Scientists have studied this regeneration process for decades, in the hopes of understanding how to regenerate human tissues, such as damaged spinal chords and even lost limbs.

Now a team of scientists from Arizona State University in the US has performed the first analysis of all RNA molecules, which translate genes into proteins, during the tail regeneration of a green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis), and worked out the genetic “recipe” that controls the regrowth process. Their results have been published in PLOS ONE.

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20142308-26062.html

Reblogged from astrodidact

Sometimes I remind myself that I almost skipped the party, that I almost went to a different college, that the whim of a minute could have changed everything and everyone. Our lives, so settled, so specific, are built on happenstance.

— Every Last One (Anna Quindlen)

(Source: wordsthat-speak)

Reblogged from wordsthat-speak

silentowl:

sociallubrication:

The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world.
Absolutely wow.


I’d just like to add that the lifespan of these giants is roughly 1 year. They grow from teeny tiny organisms to what you see in the image above in a fascinatingly short amount time.

silentowl:

sociallubrication:

The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world.

Absolutely wow.

I’d just like to add that the lifespan of these giants is roughly 1 year. They grow from teeny tiny organisms to what you see in the image above in a fascinatingly short amount time.

Reblogged from sociallubrication

lori-rocks:

spring thaw at the fjord

lori-rocks:

spring thaw at the fjord

Reblogged from lori-rocks

secretlifeofamovieproducer:

slowartday:

Andreas Franke, The Sinking World

THIS IS AMAZING

Reblogged from slowartday

chalkandwater:

Dilation and constriction of these organelles, called chromatophores, are responsible for the squid’s ability to change color.

Inside Nature’s Giants: The Giant Squid (2010)

Reblogged from chalkandwater

fuckyouverymuch:

We enjoy the view.

fuckyouverymuch:

We enjoy the view.

Reblogged from fuckyouverymuch

The summit of happiness is reached when a person is ready to be what he is.

— Desiderius Erasmus (via observando)

Reblogged from observando

After all the world is indeed beautiful and if we were any other creature than man we might be continuously happy in it.

— Sebastian Barry (via observando)

Reblogged from observando

mucholderthen:

Nauplius
Photomicrography by Rogelio Moreno G. 
Posted July 30 and August 2

  1. Viewed in normal light
  2. Dorsal view in polarized light
  3. Ventral view in polarized light
  4. Ventral view in polarized light, altered with lambda plate

NOTE:
Nauplius is one of the types of crustacean larvae; specifically, the larvae of copepods such as cyclops (which were originally called Nauplius).
[More here and here]

Reblogged from mucholderthen