Reblogged from 52hearts

Reblogged from magicsystem

If you wait for a cake to be given to you so you will be happy- then you will be happy when someone gives you a cake. But if you buy a cake (or bake one) for yourself so you will be happy, you have found the way of happiness.

— C. JoyBell C. (via observando)

Reblogged from observando

If you wait for a cake to be given to you so you will be happy- then you will be happy when someone gives you a cake. But if you buy a cake (or bake one) for yourself so you will be happy, you have found the way of happiness.

— C. JoyBell C. (via observando)

Reblogged from observando

finsterface:

If they don’t get your 30 Rock references, that’s a dealbreaker, ladies!

Reblogged from finsterface

mellyssam:

The Fault in Our Stars ❤ liked on Polyvore

mellyssam:

The Fault in Our Stars ❤ liked on Polyvore

Reblogged from mellyssam

for-science-sake:

ourplanetourocean:

Notice a difference? You aren’t the only one. 

Yet only like 1-5% of the worlds oceans are protected.

for-science-sake:

ourplanetourocean:

Notice a difference? You aren’t the only one

Yet only like 1-5% of the worlds oceans are protected.

(Source: pepperandpals)

Reblogged from pepperandpals

fagbarbie:

steal her style: Ina Garten

denim shirt: woven from Egyptian grown cotton and dyed with the wildest indigo grown in South Carolina 

pearl earrings: gathered from the bottom of the Persian Gulf

tomatoes: picked fresh from the finest gardens in Italy during the winter’s harvest

but if you can’t store bought is fine

Reblogged from fagbarbie

fellowteen:

this is the most beautiful and amazing thing i have ever read in my entire life and it makes me so so happy

fellowteen:

this is the most beautiful and amazing thing i have ever read in my entire life and it makes me so so happy

Reblogged from fellowteen

Reblogged from wearevanity

Reblogged from gifak-net

rhamphotheca:

Scientists Study “Talking” Turtles in Brazilian Amazon
via: Wildlife Conservation Society
Authors find that Giant South American river turtles have a repertoire of vocalizations for different behavioral situations, including caring for young
Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.  Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles (Podocnemis expansa), or Arraus, actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring in what is the first instance of recorded parental care in turtles.
“These distinctive sounds made by turtles give us unique insights into their behavior, although we don’t know what the sounds mean,” said Dr. Camila Ferrara, Aquatic Turtle Specialist for the WCS Brazil Program. “The social behaviors of these reptiles are much more complex than previously thought.”…
(read more: Wildlife Conservation Society)
photograph by © C. Ferrara/WCS

rhamphotheca:

Scientists Study “Talking” Turtles in Brazilian Amazon

via: Wildlife Conservation Society

Authors find that Giant South American river turtles have a repertoire of vocalizations for different behavioral situations, including caring for young

Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.

Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles (Podocnemis expansa), or Arraus, actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring in what is the first instance of recorded parental care in turtles.

“These distinctive sounds made by turtles give us unique insights into their behavior, although we don’t know what the sounds mean,” said Dr. Camila Ferrara, Aquatic Turtle Specialist for the WCS Brazil Program. “The social behaviors of these reptiles are much more complex than previously thought.”…

(read more: Wildlife Conservation Society)

photograph by © C. Ferrara/WCS

Reblogged from rhamphotheca

Reblogged from thelovelyseas